Inhaler device

The Gilbert inhaler device is based on an innovative and disruptive atomization technology (nanotechnology based Electro Hydro Dynamic Atomization) in which aerosols can vary particle size which allows, depending on the condition and the medication to be administered, the medicine to be accurately locally targeted in the bronchial tree. The droplet size can be controlled within a narrow interval creating a uniform and monodisperse droplets. With the controlled droplet size the medication can be deposited at the right place in the lungs.

Technology

Gilbert’s technology refers to a process whereby a liquid jet – the drug formulation – breaks up into droplets under influence of electrical forces. The formulation is first pumped through a nozzle at a low flow rate. Next, an electric field is applied between the nozzle and a counter electrode. Under the right conditions, a thin liquid jet will emerge from the nozzle and break up to produce monodisperse droplets. The monodisperse nature of the droplets is what enables Gilbert’s inhalers to achieve effective and precise lung deposition and to differentiate from most currently available inhalers. Furthermore, the EHDA technology is in essence controlled by electrical parameters, which again yields a number of unique benefits for developing a “smart” inhaler.

Advantages

The advantages are highly convincing:

• Capability to enable a paradigm shift in patient adherence by adaptive dosing: its electronic architecture allows for modulation of the dosage to either compensate for prior deviations from the prescribed therapy or to allow for adjustments to the prescribed therapy in amount and droplet size.

Electrospraying
scale size 0.3 mm
© Gilbert Technologies

• Aligned with global healthcare reform: its ability to improve patient adherence allows for a reduction in healthcare costs.

• Largely prevents loss in medicine turn-over to pharmaceutical companies: problems with patient adherence are estimated to generate a 10% annual loss in medicine revenues.

• Monodisperse particles with leading effective and targeted lung deposition: the ability to produce monodisperse particles ensures medication to reach the right regions of the lungs with minimal deposition in the oropharynx and hence less potential side effects. High effectiveness of the lung deposition may very well allow for lower concentrations of medicine, even further reducing potential side effects.

• High patient comfort due to the nature of the aerosol: the aerosol that is generated has a soft mist appearance, much more convenient to inhale than dry powder.

• Effective dosage administration requires virtually no patient training: current inhalers require precise coordination between inspiratory effort and inhaler activation. Any imperfections will reduce the effective lung deposition of current inhalers even further, while none of that is the case with Gilbert’s inhaler, which is breath-actuated.

• Effective dosage administration is largely independent of a patient’s inspiratory effort: since the aerosol is generated by electrical parameters and not by effort provided by the patient. Currently available dry powder inhalers require patient inspiratory effort for the inhaler to be activated, which often rules out children from the patient population. Gilbert’s inhalers do not have such restrictions.

• Effective dosage administration requires virtually no patient training: current inhalers require precise coordination between inspiratory effort and inhaler activation; any imperfections will reduce the effective lung deposition of current inhalers even further; none of that is the case with Gilbert’s inhaler which can be breath-actuated.

• Effective dosage administration is largely independent of a patient’s inspiratory effort: currently available dry powder inhalers require a minimum patient inspiratory effort for the inhaler to be activated, which often rules out children from the patient population; Gilbert’s inhaler does not have such restrictions since the aerosol is generated by electrical parameters and not by effort provided by the patient.

Pulmonary alveoli

Anatomy of the lungs

The human lungs are present in pairs and in the pleural cavities of the thorax on either side of the heart. Typical adult human lungs are about 25 to 30 cm long and are cone shaped.

The lungs normally have clear anatomical divisions known as lobes.

• The right lung is divided into three lobes – superior, middle and inferior lobes – by the oblique and horizontal fissures.

• The left lung, which is slightly smaller, is divided into two lobes – superior and inferior lobes – by the oblique fissure.

Typical lung structure and its position in the respiratory system and structure of an alveolar sac (Source: Wikipedia).

Our Partners

• Lode B.V.
• NHL University of Applied Sciences
• University Medical Centre Utrecht
• TU Delft
• Fluidda

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Contact

Gilbert Technologies BV
P.O. Box 6
1400 AA Bussum – NL